Bringing students “Back to School”

Marawi School - Photo:Marawi School

The Royal Norwegian Embassy in Manila, in partnership with UNICEF, supports schoolchildren in Marawi conflict affected communities by providing essential supplies to some 80,000 children in 257 elementary schools in Lanao Del Sur District 1

Over 179,000 schoolchildren were affected by the Marawi crisis. Two years later, more than 100,000 children have not yet returned to school after schools were reopened after the conflict. This poses a possible risk for children in terms of loss of opportunities to learn, or even completely dropping out of school.

 

“These children need to go back to schools immediately,” said Norwegian Ambassador Bjørn Jahnsen. “Norway supports UNICEF’s ‘Back to School’ programme to help children, and their families hurdle barriers so children can go back to school,” he added.

 

Norway and UNICEF is also in partnership in conducting a learner tracking system among children, parents and community leaders, which monitors the significant developments of the program as well as further understand barriers that keep these children from going back to school. Today, over 125,000 schoolchildren have been tracked and data being used to determine their locations and where extra efforts are needed. Community consultations further provided more information on the extent and reasons why children are not back in school.

 

 

Norway’s development policy is based on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) framework for efforts to promote sustainable development, peace and justice by 2030. Significant share of Norway’s support for education is used to provide schooling for children and young people who have been forced to flee their homes or who live in areas of conflict.

 

Norway is a major supporter of UNICEF humanitarian efforts, particularly its work on children’s rights to education.