How to eat healthy and sustainably? New reports launched in Oslo and Jakarta

National Nutrition Day 2019
Minister of National Development Planning, His Excellency Bambang Brodjonegoro, addressed the launch of the EAT-Lancet Commission's new report in Jakarta on National Nutrition Day (25 January). Here at the following press conference. Photo: Royal Norwegian Embassy.

These days, members of the EAT-Lancet Commission on Food, Planet, Health are launching their findings on what constitutes a healthy diet from a sustainable food system. Oslo and Jakarta were the two first cities to host such global launch events – branded #FOODCANFIXIT.

One of the key messages during the launch was that the way food is produced and consumed globally will have to change if the Sustainable Development Goals are to be reached by 2030.

Feeding a growing population a healthy diet within planetary boundaries

“Can we feed a future population of 10 billion people a healthy diet within the boundaries of our planet?” The EAT Foundation, led by Norwegian physician Gunhild Stordalen, gathered 37 experts from around the world to answer this question through proposing scientific targets for what constitutes a healthy diet from a sustainable food system.

The global report was launched in Oslo on 17 January and Jakarta on 25 January, before the EAT-Lancet Commission will continue with similar launch events in Melbourne, New York and Rome.

You can find the report and information about the launch events on EAT’s website, where you can also find shorter briefs for consumers, farmers, health professionals, chefs and other food service professionals as well as policy-makers.

More about "Healthy Diets from Sustainable Food Systems"

Deepdive on Indonesia's food system

To support the global report, EAT Foundation, the Hoffmann Centre for Sustainable Resource Economy and Catham House also prepared a policy brief with a focus on Indonesia: “Healthy Diets from Sustainable Production: Indonesia”. The report has been prepared in close cooperation with Indonesian partners, including the Ministry of Health and the Ministry for National Development Planning, with support from Norway's International Climate and Forest Initiative.

The report presents challenges linked to health, food production and the environment in Indonesia, and presents how the solutions to these challenges are very much interlinked.

Indonesia’s Minister of Health, Her Excellency Nila F. Moeloek, serves at the Advisory Board of the EAT Foundation. She addressed the launch event via video-link. In the foreword to the publication Minister Moeloek highlights that Indonesia is suffering a “double burden of malnutrition”, as more than 30 per cent of Indonesian children under the age of 5 are stunted, while close to 25 per cent of the adult population was overweight in 2014. But she also points out that Indonesia is in a unique position to provide global leadership on fixing the food supply chain.

Findings on healthy diets and sustainable production to inform Indonesia's next five year plan

During his keynote speech, Indonesia’s Minister of National Development Planning, H.E. Bambang Brodjonegoro, highlighted how the report has informed and will continue to inform the work on Indonesia’s next five year plan (for the period 2020 to 2024).

More about the report:

Walking the Talk: Accelerating Indonesia’s Shifts to Healthy Diets from Sustainable Production